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What’s It All About – Day 2 : The Corornation – The View Of The People & Breaking With Tradition

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See Previous: What’s It All About – Day 1: The Coronation Of King Charles III And Queen Camilla – Worldly Digital

As the UK prepares for the coronation of King Charles III on May 6th, 2023, the nation is buzzing with excitement and pride. From London to Edinburgh and Belfast to Cardiff, people are eagerly anticipating the ceremony that will mark the beginning of a new era in British history.

One of the most visible signs of this excitement is the proliferation of bunting and other decorations. Houses, shops, and streets are decked out in the red, white, and blue of the Union Jack, as well as the blue and gold of the new King’s coat of arms. Even traditional royal event-inspired dishes have made a come back, with coronation chicken being a popular choice for picnics and parties again whilst celebrating the coronation. In a nod to the new king’s preference, coronation quiche has become a new addition to the menu.

People have also begun lining the streets of the Mall, the route that the new king will take on his way to and from Westminster Abbey. Many have been camped out for days, hoping to get a glimpse of the coronation procession and the new monarch. The atmosphere is electric, with a sense of pride and patriotism in the air.

However, amidst all the excitement, there are signs that tradition is being lost. The younger generation, in particular, tends to be less enthused with the monarchy than their parents and grandparents. The days of blind loyalty to the royal family are over especially in light of the recent woes of royal family unrest, and even more are questioning the relevance of the monarchy in the modern world.

This sentiment was reflected in the recent backlash to a request from Lambeth Palace for members of the public to pledge allegiance to the new king. In response, the king scrapped the act of hereditary peers kneeling to pay homage before touching the crown and kissing the monarch’s right cheek, instead introducing a “Homage of the People” that will allow “a chorus of a million voices” to participate in declaring their allegiance to the king.

See the full article here:

King’s Coronation: ‘Chorus of millions’ to pledge allegiance to Charles III (telegraph.co.uk)

While some may see this as a sign of progress, others worry that the loss of traditional rituals could weaken the monarchy’s hold on the public imagination. As the new king takes the throne, he will have to navigate these changing attitudes towards the monarchy and find ways to maintain its relevance in the 21st century.

Regardless of these concerns, the coronation promises to be a momentous occasion, watched by millions around the world. The TV coverage begins at 7.30am in the UK on BBC One, BBC Two, and BBC iPlayer, with ITV following in all regions from 8.30 am. It will be a day of celebration, pride, and, for some, reflection on the changing nature of the monarchy.

This article is part of a week-long series on the coronation and the royal family. Join us tomorrow for more discussions on this topic.

See Next: What’s It All About – Day 3 : The Coronation Events And What To Expect – Worldly Digital

 

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Categories
Culture News

What’s It All About – Day 1: The Coronation Of King Charles III And Queen Camilla

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Read Time:4 Minute, 15 Second

The coronation of King Charles III and Queen Camilla is set to be a historic event, steeped in tradition and ceremony. The coronation, which is scheduled for 6th May 2023, will mark the beginning of a new era for the United Kingdom. In this article, we will take a high-level look at the history of coronations, including interesting facts and insights into the reasons for coronation. We thought it would be good to have a coronation-focussed week of updates so that you are aware of what to expect and the order of events.

The History of Coronations

Coronations have been a part of human history for centuries, dating back to ancient times. The word ‘coronation’ comes from the Latin word ‘corona’, which means ‘crown’. In ancient times, coronations were a way of legitimizing the authority of a new monarch. The first recorded coronation was that of King Saul in Israel in the 11th century BCE.

In Europe, coronations were commonly associated with the Catholic Church. During the Middle Ages, the pope would often crown kings and emperors, and the ceremony would be held in a cathedral or church. The coronation was seen as a religious ceremony, and the monarch would take an oath to uphold the Catholic faith.

In England, the first recorded coronation was that of King Edgar in 973 CE. The coronation ceremony evolved over time, with new elements added and old ones removed. The ceremony became more elaborate and ritualistic, with a focus on the divine right of kings.

The Coronation Ceremony

The coronation ceremony is a complex and highly symbolic event. The ceremony usually takes place in Westminster Abbey in London, the site of all coronations since 1066. The ceremony is divided into several parts, each with its own symbolic meaning.

The first part of the ceremony is the anointing of the monarch with holy oil. This is done to symbolize the monarch’s divine right to rule. The monarch is anointed on the head, breast, and hands, and is then dressed in the coronation robes.

The next part of the ceremony is the presentation of the sword, sceptre, and orb. These are symbols of the monarch’s power and authority. The monarch is then crowned with the St. Edward’s Crown, which has been used in every coronation since 1661.

After the crowning, the monarch receives homage from the peers and bishops. This is followed by the singing of the national anthem and a procession through the streets of London.

Interesting Facts

Here are some interesting facts about coronations:

  • The longest reigning monarch in British history, Queen Elizabeth II, was not actually crowned until more than a year after her accession to the throne.
  • King George IV’s coronation was so expensive that it bankrupted him. He spent over £240,000 on the ceremony, which would be equivalent to several million pounds today.
  • The anointing oil used in coronations is made from a secret recipe that has been passed down through the ages.
  • The coronation of King Charles III will be the first coronation to take place in the 21st century.
  • In the coronation of King George VI, the archbishop of Canterbury accidentally knocked the crown off the king’s head.
  • The Queen’s jewels are so valuable that they are transported to Westminster Abbey in a bulletproof car.
Reasons for Coronation

The coronation of a monarch serves several purposes. First and foremost, it legitimizes the authority of the new ruler. It is a way of increasing the support that the monarch has from the people and the church.

The coronation also serves as a way of demonstrating the monarch’s power and authority. It is a highly symbolic event that is meant to inspire awe and respect in the people.

Finally, the coronation is a way of reinforcing the monarch’s duty to uphold the laws and traditions of the realm. The monarch takes an oath during the ceremony to do all he can to protect and defend the country, to be just and merciful, and to maintain the laws and customs of the land.

In addition, the coronation is a way of celebrating the ascension of a new monarch to the throne. It is a time of great pomp and pageantry, with processions, music, and festivities. The coronation is also an opportunity for the monarch to connect with the people and to inspire loyalty and devotion.

The coronation of King Charles III and Queen Camilla is set to be an historic event, steeped in tradition and ceremony. The coronation ceremony is a complex and highly symbolic event that has evolved over centuries. It serves several purposes, including legitimizing the authority of the monarch, demonstrating the monarch’s power and authority, and reinforcing the monarch’s duty to uphold the laws and traditions of the realm. The coronation is also a time of celebration and festivity, with processions, music, and festivities.

We will release further articles daily covering the topic and events in more details so don’t forget to check back each day.

See Next : What’s It All About – Day 2 : The View Of The People & Breaking With Tradition – Worldly Digital

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