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What’s It All About – Day 3 : The Coronation Events And What To Expect

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See Previous: What’s It All About – Day 2 : The View Of The People & Breaking With Tradition – Worldly Digital

On 6th May 2023, King Charles III and Queen Consort Camilla will be crowned at Westminster Abbey. The ceremony is expected to combine religious service and pageantry in a day of splendour and formality.

Westminster Abbey
Westminster Abbey

The procession from Buckingham Palace to Westminster Abbey will start at 10:20am (British Time) and will feature customs dating back more than 1,000 years.

The ceremony will start at 11:00 and will be punctuated with music selected by the King. Prince George and Camilla’s grandchildren will be among the pages at Westminster Abbey, and for the first time, members of the public will be invited to pledge their allegiance to the King. During the recognition stage, the Lady of the Garter, the Lady of the Thistle, and a George Cross holder from the armed forces will make the subsequent declarations.

In a break from tradition, female clergy will play a prominent role, and religious leaders from other faiths will have an active part.

Following the recognition stage, the King will make his way to the altar for the Anointing and Investiture. The Archbishop of Canterbury will anoint him with holy oil on his hands, chest, and head, and present him with the Colobium Sindonis, a white linen tunic representing purity, and the Supertunica, a gold silk robe symbolizing the splendour of kingship.

The King will receive the ring, sceptres, and orb, which represent his commitment to uphold the Church, aid in protecting his people and maintain justice. He will then be enthroned upon St Edward’s Chair, a powerful symbol of the continuity of monarchy and England’s history.

Sovereign's Orb
Sovereign’s Orb

The archbishop will crown the King by placing St Edward’s Crown on the his head. At this point the abbey’s bells will ring for two minutes and trumpets will sound and gun salutes will be fired across the country.

St Edward's Crown
St Edward’s Crown

The final stage of the coronation will be the Homage, where members of the Royal Family, peers, and bishops will pay their respects and pledge their loyalty to the new monarch.

Queen Camilla’s crowning will be a simpler affair with no oath to be pledged. She will be crowned with Queen Mary’s Crown weighing in at over half a kilo and encrusted with more than 2000 diamonds.

Queen Mary's Crown
Queen Mary’s Crown

After a singing of the National Anthem and a procession back to Buckingham Palace, the King and Queen Consort will appear on the balcony and wave to the crowds.

While the coronation will follow many centuries-old traditions, there are also a few notable deviations. For instance, the King and Queen Consort will travel in the Diamond Jubilee State Coach instead of the traditional Gold State Coach. Also, the ceremony will include female clergy and representatives of other faiths, marking a more diverse and inclusive approach.

 

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Categories
Culture News

What’s It All About – Day 2 : The Corornation – The View Of The People & Breaking With Tradition

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Read Time:2 Minute, 47 Second

See Previous: What’s It All About – Day 1: The Coronation Of King Charles III And Queen Camilla – Worldly Digital

As the UK prepares for the coronation of King Charles III on May 6th, 2023, the nation is buzzing with excitement and pride. From London to Edinburgh and Belfast to Cardiff, people are eagerly anticipating the ceremony that will mark the beginning of a new era in British history.

One of the most visible signs of this excitement is the proliferation of bunting and other decorations. Houses, shops, and streets are decked out in the red, white, and blue of the Union Jack, as well as the blue and gold of the new King’s coat of arms. Even traditional royal event-inspired dishes have made a come back, with coronation chicken being a popular choice for picnics and parties again whilst celebrating the coronation. In a nod to the new king’s preference, coronation quiche has become a new addition to the menu.

People have also begun lining the streets of the Mall, the route that the new king will take on his way to and from Westminster Abbey. Many have been camped out for days, hoping to get a glimpse of the coronation procession and the new monarch. The atmosphere is electric, with a sense of pride and patriotism in the air.

However, amidst all the excitement, there are signs that tradition is being lost. The younger generation, in particular, tends to be less enthused with the monarchy than their parents and grandparents. The days of blind loyalty to the royal family are over especially in light of the recent woes of royal family unrest, and even more are questioning the relevance of the monarchy in the modern world.

This sentiment was reflected in the recent backlash to a request from Lambeth Palace for members of the public to pledge allegiance to the new king. In response, the king scrapped the act of hereditary peers kneeling to pay homage before touching the crown and kissing the monarch’s right cheek, instead introducing a “Homage of the People” that will allow “a chorus of a million voices” to participate in declaring their allegiance to the king.

See the full article here:

King’s Coronation: ‘Chorus of millions’ to pledge allegiance to Charles III (telegraph.co.uk)

While some may see this as a sign of progress, others worry that the loss of traditional rituals could weaken the monarchy’s hold on the public imagination. As the new king takes the throne, he will have to navigate these changing attitudes towards the monarchy and find ways to maintain its relevance in the 21st century.

Regardless of these concerns, the coronation promises to be a momentous occasion, watched by millions around the world. The TV coverage begins at 7.30am in the UK on BBC One, BBC Two, and BBC iPlayer, with ITV following in all regions from 8.30 am. It will be a day of celebration, pride, and, for some, reflection on the changing nature of the monarchy.

This article is part of a week-long series on the coronation and the royal family. Join us tomorrow for more discussions on this topic.

See Next: What’s It All About – Day 3 : The Coronation Events And What To Expect – Worldly Digital

 

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